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Features

Film And Food: Sharing The Stories Of Immigrants With Conservative America

Film And Food: Sharing The Stories Of Immigrants With Conservative America | WGBH | Craving Boston

Like a lot of creatives distressed by the current political climate, filmmakers Daniel Klein and Mirra Fine want to tell stories that matter right now. They want to make a difference.

The husband-and-wife duo behind the Perennial Plate, a weekly web-based program showcasing sustainable food and farming practices, believe in the power of a meal combined with storytelling to bring people together.

  • May 4, 2017

More Salt In School Lunch, Less Nutrition Info On Menus: Trump Rolls Back Food Rules

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue eats lunch with students at the Catoctin Elementary School in Leesburg, Va., on Monday. (Photo: Carolyn Kaster/AP)

The Trump administration has said it wants to remove burdensome regulation, and on Monday it served up a taste of what that looks like when it comes to two aspects of food policy: school lunch and calorie labels on menus.

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced a plan to delay a mandate that would require schools to further reduce sodium levels in the meals they serve. In addition, Perdue wants to give the green light to schools that want to serve some grains that aren't whole-grain rich.

  • May 2, 2017

Keeping Portuguese Traditions And Brother’s Memory Alive At The Neighborhood

Sheila Borges-Foley doesn't run the business because she loves cooking. She runs it out of a deep love for her heritage, and a love for her late brother.

Keeping Portuguese Traditions And Brother’s Memory Alive At The Neighborhood | WGBH | Craving Boston

Sheila Borges-Foley isn’t in the restaurant business because she likes cooking. She’s in it, because of her Portuguese family’s roots in the industry, and an abiding love for her late brother. She was one of the 10 restaurateurs whose food was featured at the YUM fundraiser on April 6, which supported the work of The Welcome Project. The seventh annual fundraiser coincided with the 30th anniversary of Somerville’s sanctuary city status, and The Welcome Project’s existence.

  • May 2, 2017

Mexican Chef And Owner Of Rincon Mexicano Cooks To Pass Down Traditions Of His Childhood

It is when Lorenzo Reyes makes tacos that the memories come flooding back.

Mexican Chef And Owner Of Rincon Mexicano Cooks To Pass Down Traditions Of His Childhood | WGBH | Craving Boston

Lorenzo Reyes learned to cook from his mother, before she passed away. He, his father, and his older siblings cared for the rest of the family in Mexico City. Cooking allows him to pass on the memories of cooking with his family to his own children. He was one of the 10 restaurateurs whose food was featured at the YUM fundraiser on April 6, which supported the work of The Welcome Project.

  • May 2, 2017

Fasika Chef And Owner Makes Yearly Trek Back To Homeland To Create Dishes

It wasn’t until he was hundreds of miles away from Ethiopia that Befekadu Defar fell in love with the food of his childhood.

Fasika Chef And Owner Makes Yearly Trek Back To Homeland To Create Dishes | WGBH | Craving Boston

Befekadu Defar is passionate about Ethiopian food. Hailing from Addis Ababa, he admits he didn’t always care about his homeland’s culinary traditions. He was one of the 10 restaurateurs whose food was featured at the YUM fundraiser on April 6, which supported the work of The Welcome Project. The seventh annual fundraiser coincided with the 30th anniversary of Somerville’s sanctuary city status, and The Welcome Project’s existence.

“My whole passion started at the school [in Switzerland], Defar said.

  • April 27, 2017

The Cocktail King Of Cuba: The Man Who Invented Hemingway's Favorite Daiquiri

The Cocktail King Of Cuba: The Man Who Invented Hemingway's Favorite Daiquiri | WGBH | Craving Boston

Ernest Hemingway liked to get up early.

He did his best writing in the morning, standing in front of his typewriter, plucking the keys as fast as the words might come to him. This was fortunate, because by 11 a.m., the Havana heat began to creep into his rented room at the Hotel Ambos Mundos. He couldn't think in the swelter, much less write.

  • April 25, 2017

Guatemalan Chef And Tu Y Yo Co-Owner Follows Mexican Culinary Tradition

Adolfo Alvarado believes that chosen families can be just as strong as those bound by blood, and it's in the kitchen that any cultural barriers fall away.

Guatemalan Chef And Tu Y Yo Co-Owner Follows Mexican Culinary Tradition | WGBH | Craving Boston

Adolfo Alvarado isn’t Mexican, but his professional life has revolved around Mexican food since he was 20 years old. He was one of the 10 restaurateurs whose food was featured at the YUM fundraiser on April 6, which supported the work of The Welcome Project. The seventh annual fundraiser coincided with the 30th anniversary of Somerville’s sanctuary city status, and The Welcome Project’s existence.

  • April 25, 2017

Is It Safe To Eat Moldy Bread?

You may be tempted to save a piece of a moldy loaf by discarding the fuzzy bits. But food safety experts say molds penetrate deeper into the food than what's visible to us. And eating moldy food comes with health risks.

Like politics and music, the question of whether to eat moldy food can divide families, with relatives' admonishments reverberating in one's head for years.

"Every time I throw out moldy bread, I can still hear my dad lecturing me: 'That's perfectly good! Just cut that part off! It's penicillin!' " says Shawna Iwaniuk, a graphic designer in Alberta, Canada. "But ... I just can't."

So, who's right? Is the furry green stuff a death knell for a baguette, or just a minor setback?

For food safety experts, the answer is clear: Moldy bread is bad news.

  • April 21, 2017

7 Essential Kitchen Tools For Healthy Cooking (And Where To Find Them)

Let’s make sure that we have the tools necessary to create amazing, healthy meals. Here’s a dietitian’s list of seven must-have utensils and appliances. 

7 Essential Kitchen Tools for Healthy Cooking (And Where To Find Them) | WGBH | Craving Boston

When people find out that I’m a dietitian, they often ask some version of this question: “So…what should I be doing differently?” While I used to struggle to respond to such a broad question, I have now prepared an appropriately simple answer: cook more.

Cooking is one of the best ways to take control of your health. Sure, restaurants are wonderful and incredibly convenient at times, but they force us to relinquish control over how our food is prepared. When we cook at home, we are in charge!

  • April 20, 2017

Making Weight: The Unseen Side Of Mixed Martial Arts

UFC fighter Tony Martin describes what it takes to execute a healthy weight cut.

Making Weight: The Unseen Side Of Mixed Martial Arts I WGBH I Craving Boston

When I first started training at Sityodtong Boston, a gym for Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), I found the professional and amateur fighters pretty intimidating. But over time I discovered that they're super nice people making huge sacrifices to succeed in a dangerous sport. A funny thing you may not assume about fighters is that for a bunch of rough and tumble guys and gals, they’re obsessed with their weight. Ask any fighter what he or she weighs on a given day and they can tell you, to the pound, where they tip the scales.

  • April 17, 2017

When Gluten Is The Villain, Could A Common Virus Be The Trigger?

For people with celiac disease gluten-free food is a must. A new study suggests that a common virus may trigger the onset of the disease.

A new study raises a novel idea about what might trigger celiac disease, a condition that makes patients unable to tolerate foods containing gluten.

The study suggests that a common virus may be to blame.

For people with celiac disease, gluten can wreak havoc on their digestive systems. Their immune systems mistake gluten as a dangerous substance.

  • April 8, 2017

Bison Or Brian? From A Calorie Perspective, Cannibalism Didn't Pay For Paleo Humans

Archaeologists have suggested that Stone Age people sometimes ate one another for nutritional reasons. But a new study suggests that from a calorie perspective, hunting and eating other humans wasn't efficient.

The meat on an adult human's bones could feed another person for over two weeks, or maybe a whole Stone Age tribe for a couple of days, according to a new report on the practice of Paleolithic cannibalism. No wonder, then, that evidence of cannibalism in ancient humans pops up in the archaeological record from time to time.

  • April 6, 2017

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