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Features

Three-Star Chef Asks Michelin Guide To Leave Him Out: 'I Will Be Able To Feel Free'

Acclaimed chef Sebastien Bras stands in the kitchen of his three-star restaurant Le Suquet, in Laguiole, France, on Thursday. This week he asked not to be included in the 2018 Michelin Guide.

Ah, to be a chef with three Michelin stars: The envy of your peers. Reservation lists months long. The satisfaction of reaching the highest level of culinary art.

The crippling pressure to stay on top.

Sébastien Bras runs Le Suquet, a restaurant in the southern French town of Laguiole that first won its three stars in 1999, when it was run by his father Michel.

  • September 21, 2017

5 Unexpected Cider Pairings That Are Outrageously Delicious

We'd like to encourage you to think outside the cheese and pie box for your next cider, and try one of these pairings instead.

Cider is enjoying a surge in recognition on the culinary scene.

It’s sorely overdue, if you ask me.

Enjoyed in Europe for centuries, cider is now getting the respect it deserves in the States, not only as a stand-alone sipper but as a legit food partner as well. More restaurants are offering more cider options as part of their menu than ever before. Bottom line - cider is food-friendly. It’s also more versatile than you might think...

  • September 18, 2017

Coffee, Bees and Climate Change Are Linked In Ways You May Not Have Expected

A coffee farmer picks fresh coffee cherries in Colombia. New climate research suggests Latin America faces major declines in coffee-growing regions, as well as bees, which help coffee to grow.

Pollinators such as bees play a key part of producing the beans that go into your morning cup of coffee.

In fact, they are responsible for about 20 to 25 percent of coffee production by increasing the plants' yield, Taylor Ricketts, the director of the University of Vermont's Gund Institute for Environment, tells The Two-Way. Bees actually increase the quality of the beans by making their size more uniform.

  • September 11, 2017

Grocery Prices Have Been Falling. Did You Notice?

Retail food prices have just been through the longest period of deflation in about 60 years.

Food prices in America were down for the longest period in about 60 years.

Wait, what?

It's not something that shoppers seemed to have noticed much.

"Are you serious? Really?" says Michelle German, holding a bag of groceries and wine at a Harris Teeter store in Washington, D.C. "I just spent about $40 dollars on four items and I'm like, wait, how did I spend that much money?"

  • September 6, 2017

Comparing Apples to Apples - Cider Simplified.

A little know-how goes a long way in appreciating this often-overlooked drink.

Americans just don’t get cider. We think little more of it than a sweet drink made from apples. Sometimes it’s alcoholic. Sometimes it’s cloudy. Or not. We kinda don’t care. Cider isn’t taken very seriously. Usually relegated to being a last-resort ordering choice, cider has been fighting for legitimacy in the United States for a long time. Sadly, it’s a totally misunderstood beverage.

Poor cider.

  • September 5, 2017

Using Local Farms To Bring Global Cuisines To Life

Retno Pratiwi and Chandra Gouldrup are both award winning chefs in the Boston area but their cuisines couldn't be more different. They find common ground, and inspiration in the same place: their local ingredients. 

Retno Pratiwi is the head chef and co-owner at Kaki Lima, a pop-up restaurant that's been making its rounds in Boston and introducing its diners to an adventurous and nostalgic version of Indonesian cuisine.  

Chandra Gouldrup is the head chef and owner of The Farmers Daughter in Easton, where she's perfected an elevated American breakfast and lunch fare made with locally sourced ingredients provided by farms in New England.

  • September 1, 2017

Laser Pointers And Hand Signals: A Deaf Chef In The Kitchen

David Uzzell at work in the kitchen at Marcel's. Uzzell has a written list of daily tasks from chef and owner Robert Wiedmaier at his station, and his ever-present notepad and pencil on the shelf above serves as communication tools for more specific instructions.

Amid the hustle and bustle of the kitchen at Marcel's, a fine dining restaurant in Washington, D.C., one member of the staff is immune to the noise. It's David Uzzell, the 28-year-old saucier responsible for such delicacies as pan-seared foie gras or mushroom mornay sauce.

Uzzell is a deaf chef — a rarity in the vast majority of restaurant kitchens. When chef and owner Robert Wiedmaier needs to get Uzzell's attention while expediting during dinner service, he pokes him in the shoulder.

  • August 31, 2017

A List Of Everyone You'll Find At The 2017 Food & Wine Fest

Literally a comprehensive list, plus interactive map, of everyone you can expect to visit and taste at this year's Taste of WGBH Food and Wine Festival. Find your favorites and map out your weekend, it's food fest time! 

It’s that time of year again, food lovers. The Taste of WGBH Food & Wine Festival, considered the largest food and wine festival in New England, is back in full swing October 5 - 8. 

  • August 29, 2017

For New England Farmers Looking To Make Ends Meet, The Sun Provides A Harvest

Farmer Kevin Sullivan put solar panels on a portion of his property in Suffield, Conn.

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60-acre farm near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks: "What's farmland?"

"You picture [a] cow," says Sullivan. Perhaps "Farmer Joe, like me." Maybe you think about my tomatoes and peppers, he adds.

But now, Sullivan and other New England farmers are turning their farms into sources of another kind of commodity – electricity. They are allowing utility companies to set up solar panels on their land, and in the process making some much-needed extra money.

  • August 24, 2017

The Subtle Science Of Mixology

From bitters to simple syrups, champagne flutes to tiki glasses, The Boston Shaker has got it all. We headed to their store to learn more how to create balanced cocktails and the tools you need to make them.

The Interior of The Boston Shaker.

I enjoy a well-made cocktail. It may be my ego overinflating the capabilities of my palate, but I do prefer my drinks to have more flavor and complexity than you tend to get with well liquor and a soda gun. Craft spirits? Oh, yes please. Bitters? Mm-hmm. A rhubarb shrub? Fancy! Muddled herbs? Hell yes.

  • August 23, 2017

'What She Ate': The Culinary Biographies Of Some Remarkable Women

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Here's an unlikely trio - the poet William Wordsworth's sister, Eleanor Roosevelt and Hitler's mistress. What did they have in common? Well, here's one thing - they ate. Exactly what they ate and why is a subject of a new book called, "What She Ate: Six Remarkable Women And The Food That Tells Their Stories." NPR's special correspondent Susan Stamberg says it is a seriously and hilariously researched culinary history.

  • August 22, 2017

To Kitsch And Back: Tiki Drink Culture, Past And Present

The next time you sip a mai tai, thank Ernest Raymond Beaumont-Gantt. Don’t recognize the name? How about Donn Beach? It turns out they’re the same guy, and we have a lot to thank him for.

In 1934, the year after prohibition was repealed, Beach (née Beaumont-Gantt) opened a small Los Angeles bar and called it Don the Beachcomber’s. It served Cantonese cuisine and exotic, fruit-based drinks.

  • August 21, 2017

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