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Students Serve Up Stories of Beloved Family Recipes in a Global Cookbook

<em>Atole de elote</em> is a warm corn drink from Central America. Student Jose Rivas wrote an essay about a weekly tradition of enjoying <em>atole</em> with his late father in El Salvador, and how the drink helped him to feel more at home after he moved to the U.S.

Washington, D.C.'s Capital City Public Charter School feels like a mini United Nations. Many of the school's 981 students are first-generation Americans with backgrounds spanning the globe, from El Salvador to Nigeria to Vietnam. So when the staff of the literacy non-profit 826DC began a book-publishing project with the junior class, they picked a topic everyone could relate to that also left room for cultural expression: food.

  • March 25, 2017

Are Kitchen Incubators The Future Of Food?

Somerville's Foundation Kitchen leading the charge of communal entrepreneurialism.

Are Kitchen Incubators The Future Of Food? I WGBH I Craving Boston

Recently we covered the hazards and challenges associated with opening a restaurant - skyrocketing rents, overwhelming red tape and massive financial obligations chief among them. Despite the risks, there remains enthusiasm across the food and beverage sector. And not solely in restaurants but also in the world of small batch products, food trucks, catering companies and meal delivery services.

  • March 23, 2017

For The First Time, U.S. Wins Elite Bocuse D'Or Culinary Competition

The competition pits 24 chefs against each other and is billed as the "most demanding and prestigious reward in world gastronomy," started by legendary French chef Paul Bocuse.

U.S. chef Mathew Peters (center), celebrates on the podium with teammates after winning the "Bocuse d'Or" trophy, in Lyon. (Photo Credit: Laurent Cipriani/AP)

For the first time, a U.S. team walked away with top honors at the prestigious Bocuse d'Or chef competition, seen as the Olympics of cooking.

The U.S. team was led by chef Mathew Peters and commis, or assistant, Harrison Turone. Norway took silver, and Iceland took bronze.

The competition pits 24 chefs against each other and is billed as the "most demanding and prestigious reward in world gastronomy," started by legendary French chef Paul Bocuse. The U.S. has long been an underdog: It has only stood on the podium once before, when it took silver in 2015.

  • January 30, 2017

So You Want To Open A Restaurant? This Advice Will Give You A Puncher's Chance

Elisha Siegel explores the challenging world of restaurant ownership and finds out it can be a real slugfest.

So You Want To Open A Restaurant: This Advice Will Give You A Puncher's Chance I WGBH I Craving Boston

I used to dream about being a cage fighter (for the record, I’m 5’5’’, 135 pounds and Jewish). I trained hard and tried to eat right. I’d visualize my fights and found the perfect walkout song. I worked through sprains, contusions and cauliflower ear – but in the end I couldn’t make the sacrifice. I hate jogging and love ice cream. And being a comedian I often get theme music anyway, so it’s not a total loss.

  • January 29, 2017

Food As Medicine: It's Not Just A Fringe Idea Anymore

Treating people through nutrition is not a new idea, but it's making inroads as more medical professionals make meals a formal part of care, rather than relying solely on medications.

Dr. Daniel Nadeau gives Allison Scott tips on getting kids to eat healthy at Ralph's Supermarket in Huntington Beach, Calif. (Photo Credit: David Gorn)

Several times a month, you can find a doctor in the aisles of Ralph's market in Huntington Beach, Calif., wearing a white coat and helping people learn about food. On one recent day, this doctor was Daniel Nadeau, wandering the cereal aisle with Allison Scott, giving her some ideas on how to feed kids who studiously avoid anything that tastes healthy.

"Have you thought about trying smoothies in the morning?" he asks her. "The frozen blueberries and raspberries are a little cheaper, and berries are really good for the brain."

  • January 19, 2017

Organic Chickens Get More Room To Roam

It took years of heated debate, but the federal government has finally decided just how much living space an organic chicken should have.

Cage-free chickens walk in a fenced pasture at an organic farm near Waukon, Iowa. (Photo Credit: Charlie Neibergall/AP)

It took years of heated debate, but the federal government has finally decided just how much living space an organic chicken should have.

It's part of a new set of rules that cover many aspects of animal welfare in the organic food industry.

  • January 19, 2017

How A Destitute, Abandoned Parisian Boy Became The First Celebrity Chef

Marie-Antoine Carême died 184 years ago today. But in his short lifetime, he would forever revolutionize French haute cuisine and gain worldwide fame. Some of his concepts are still in use.

Marie-Antoine Carême began his hardscrabble life in Paris during the French Revolution, but eventually his penchant for design and his baking talent brought him fame and fortune. (Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

The bustling Paris streets were rutted and caked in thick mud, but there was always a breathtaking sight to behold in the shop windows of Patisserie de la Rue de la Paix. By 1814, people crowded outside the bakery, straining for a glimpse of the latest confection created by the young chef who worked inside.

  • January 16, 2017

Bountiful Beach Buffet: Fresh Seaweed Is Making Waves Among Foragers

Ocean algae is plentiful and grows rapidly, and most of it is safe to eat. People have been harvesting seaweed for thousands of years, but now it's become so popular, you can even take a class.

Seaweed is plentiful and grows rapidly, and most of it is safe to eat. People have been harvesting seaweed for thousands of years, but now it's become so popular, you can even take a class. (Photo Credit: Joy Lanzendorfer for NPR)

As seaweed continues to gain popularity for its nutritional benefits and culinary versatility, more people are skipping the dried stuff in the grocery store and going straight to the source: the ocean itself.

At low tide on West Coast beaches, foragers hop between rocks looking for bladderwrack, sea lettuce and Irish moss to take home with them. Sea vegetable foraging has become so common, in fact, that you can take a class to learn what to harvest and what to avoid.

  • January 16, 2017

The Next Generation Of Farmers Is Being Trained In New York City High Schools

Natalie Arroyo is a senior "Aggie," one of 600 New York City public school students enrolled in a specialized, four-year agriculture program at John Bowne High School in Queens. She plans to become an agriculture educator after college. (Photo Credit: Lela Nargi for NPR)

It's Monday, 8 a.m., and these teens have already mucked stalls in the barn and fed the goats, alpacas and miniature cows. They've rounded up eggs in the henhouse, harvested cabbages and a few green-tinged tomatoes, and arranged them in tidy tiers to sell in the Agriculture Store. Now they're ready to put in a full day of classes.

  • January 5, 2017

Squamscot Soda: Helping You Wash It All Down Since 1863

Tom Conner, the current owner of Conner Bottling Works, is part of the fourth generation of the family-owned business. (Photo Credit: Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio)

The machinery inside Conner Bottling Works doesn't sparkle like it used to. In fact, everything and everybody in here looks like they could use a break.

"We are the last family-owned independent bottler in the state of New Hampshire," says Dan Conner, part of the fifth generation to work here. "A hundred and fifty-three years, from start to today. Never shut down, never stopped."

  • January 4, 2017

By Returning To Farming's Roots, He Found His American Dream

David on his Farm (Photo Credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

Eighteen years ago, on New Year's Eve, David Fisher visited an old farm in western Massachusetts, near the small town of Conway. No one was farming there at the time, and that's what had drawn Fisher to the place. He was scouting for farmland.

"I remember walking out [to the fallow fields] at some point," Fisher recalls. "And in the moonlight – it was all snowy – it was like a blank canvas."

  • December 31, 2016

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